Review – Conan The Slayer #5 & 6

  • Writer: Cullen Bunn
  • Artist: Sergio Davila
  • Colorist: Michael AtiyehCover
  • Artist: Admira Wijaya
  • Published by: Dark horse Comics

After Killing his father Kyrlo and saved by his mysterious benefactor, Kyrlo has taking refuge in an old temple and now seems to have regretted killing his father, consume with anger of being passed over as king Kyrlo was tricked into helping the mysterious sorcerer with knowing it. The Sorcerer used his hate and anger Kylro had for his father against him, in the end Kyrlo’s traitorous actions got him and his brother killed, while at the same time putting Conan, Oksana and the Kozaks in danger from undead warriors of the past. Issue #5 ends with Conan coming face to face with the mysterious Sorcerer/ Necromancer

With tribe leader gone along with his sons the lord of Kharwarizm, Jehungir Agha sets forth a plan to take out the Kozak tribes, he sends assassins who attack during Taraslan’s pyre and quick begin to exterminate the Kozak tribe, During the battle the body of Taraslan rises, covered in flames Taraslan grabs the leader of the assassins and burns him to a crisp. When it’s all said, and done the Kozak name Conan their new leader despite his refusal. Conan becomes conflicted about the responsibility of leading the Kozak tribe and decides to take a walk through the woods and comes across a blood trail, at the end of the trail Conan is shock to find a half-eaten human corpse, in the background we see a humanoid beast looking at Conan from within the trees.

Conclusion: Necromancy is heavily at work here, at least in these latest issues (5&6), it seems as if the true main antagonist is pulling the strings using necromancy and the prime suspect has to be Ghaznavi, the priest who Jehungir Agha has working for him. What makes this issue work are the multiple potential sub-plots going on within this issue and for upcoming future, Cullen Bunn doesn’t just focuses on Conan but

Links: Preview | Order (Digital)                          Release Date: January 25, 2017

Story:★★★★☆ 
Art:★★★★☆ 
Dialog:★★★★☆ 
Overall:★★★★☆ 

Review – Ether #1

  • Script: Matt Kindt
  • Artist: David Rubin
  • Cover Artist: David Rubin
  • Lettering: David Rubin
  • Editor: Daniel Chabon
  • Publisher: Mike Richardson

Crossing worldly or otherworldly planes of existence is a tricky thing, Boone Dias makes it part of his daily exploration though as readers dive through Ether. The unique tale from Matt Kindt plays with humor and shades of drama as the story follows Boone and his scientific exploits to unravel the mystery of the Ether and at times the crimes and conflicts within.

Issue one drops readers in mid-story, leaving readers straight to the punch as Boone has character traits revealed and starts meeting some of the center cast. Soon the world itself starts to open and develop into the heart of the conflict, Kindt is careful with the balance of Boone and his serious tone and the loose mannerisms of those in Ether and Agartha as each on their own could throw this first experience off. Having a scientist that carries a dry delivery and a disconnected relationship is hard on a story but with characters like Glum it helps with those hurdles.

In this latest trip to the Ether some tragedy and high level foul play are at work and waiting for him, as one who thrives on mysteries and challenges it’s hard for him to pass up the opportunity but just what he’s getting into might be bigger than he ever expected. So far he’s been able to rationalize the world and cases before him, now that he’s stepping into a darker side of the Ether it will be a question if he’s able to keep up that fortune.

The issue sets the stage for many of the characters and the large challenge ahead. As an entry to the series its tightly held and filled with the essentials to build the upcoming issues. The art from David Rubin holds consistent and panels sell to the story key moments and tone the book hopes to set. It’s a different book, not hard sci-fi or pure humor, when looking for a book that’s a mix of both but playful in delivery I’d say this delivers as an interesting read. We’ll just have to see how the story continues to develop from here.

Release date: Out Now

Story:★★★★☆ 
Art:★★★★☆ 
Dialog:★★★★☆ 
Overall:★★★★☆ 

Review – Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season 11 #3

  • Script: Christos Gage
  • Artist: Rebekah Isaacs
  • Colorist: Dan Jackson
  • Cover Artist: Steve Morris
  • Lettering: Richard Starkings and Comicraft’s Jimmy Betancourt
  • Executive Producer: Joss Whedon

The internment camp, basically the strongest moment to ring out of issue 2 of this season. As the government goes nuclear on supernatural beings in the country suddenly the walls start closing in on everyone. With Buffy standing firm to protect her friends and family it’ll be a rough ride ahead.

A House Divided dumps more problems on Buffy and the group, with new mandates from the government it’s only a matter of time before federal slayers come knocking on her door for those dearest. We see Buffy trying to micromanage the situation as much as possible and try to keep some control over what’s going down. Christos Gage paints a grim future for the group, even with their best efforts they can’t possibly keep the group going in the face of everything going on.

We see Willow take a firm stand in her beliefs after the chaos in issue 2, knowing the dangers to those who even barely met her, she makes the sacrifices she needs to. Buffy and Spike also face their own wall, given vampires aren’t a magical exemption to the rule Buffy knows they’re coming. It’s a charged issue as the group makes decisions for the best of all their futures given their climate. Rebekah Isaacs does well to pull out emotion from each character through the panels as each of them carefully set the tone with the gestures displayed. Dan Jackson does well with intensity and playing on saturation to show the mood of the world and the emotion within each character with subtle shifts in the panels.

It’s certainly not looking good, in this case the world or at least the nation might just be against Buffy now. We’ll have to wait and see what comes of all this next month.

Release date: Out Now

Story:★★★★½ 
Art:★★★★½ 
Dialog:★★★★½ 
Overall:★★★★½ 

Review – Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season 11 #2

  • Script: Christos Gage
  • Artist: Rebekah Isaacs
  • Colorist: Dan Jackson
  • Cover Artist: Steve Morris
  • Lettering: Richard Starkings and Comicraft’s Jimmy Betancourt
  • Executive Producer: Joss Whedon

With Buffy facing an internal crisis of where she’s at in life as other celebrate new milestones and life moments, the world itself faces another crisis that has already left a dark mark on her city. There really is never time for Buffy to just get a moment, and this tension and momentum carry into issue 2 as they try to sort out a Shenlong dragon attack after a massive tsunami strike.

Tension really soars in issue 2, the entire gang is swept up in angry mobs, hate crimes and rising political problems that look to impact supernatural beings across the nation with knee-jerk legislation and actions. We see the cast split amongst themselves throughout the issue, Spike and Willow fearing for the worst while others hope to tread lighter paths in hopes the situation will not spiral out nearly as far.

Old faces cross paths and social unrest rages on as the mystery behind the dragon drives everyone to the limit without an answer. Christos Gage really plays all angles here, the cast is struggling to stomach the potential future they face and the world gets very ugly in a short amount of time. Rebekah Isaacs does well in the chapter, only some of the panels gave a slight bump in the experience as thicker ink brought about weird inconsistencies. Dan Jackson plays between muted colors and careful splashes of vibrancy to highlight the actions and moods of each panel.

Season 11 isn’t getting any easier, hopefully Buffy and the rest of the group can figure out how to keep it together.

Release date: Out Now

Story:★★★★½ 
Art:★★★★☆ 
Dialog:★★★★½ 
Overall:★★★★½ 

Review – Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season 11 #1

  • Script: Christos Gage
  • Artist: Rebekah Isaacs
  • Colorist: Dan Jackson
  • Cover Artist: Steve Morris
  • Lettering: Richard Starkings and Comicraft’s Jimmy Betancourt
  • Executive Producer: Joss Whedon

The San Francisco life is setting in well with Spike and Buffy, as they keep to classic staples of demon slaying while adjusting to life with a born again 13 year old Giles in the picture. Season 11 takes things into the life of Supernatural Consulting and solving darker crimes in the city, Xander and Dawn showing growth as they advance in their lives and relationship and Willow gets to set down some new roots starting a new Coven of her own.

Sounds peachy, except it’s a Buffy story so there’s always more under the surface, bright exteriors crack and fade, showing a rougher side of things and new challenges are always waiting. Legends emerge and chaos reigns, Rebekah Issacs paints the pages of issue 1 with rubble and chaos, with help from Dan Jackson the pages come to life with atmosphere and action that flow seamlessly once things really turn bad.

Christos Gage wastes no time playing with the main cast, pulling at their strings not only to send them into action and set each stage up, but also pulling at their hearts to continue to allow us a window into the voices that nag at them when they operate between those battles. Rebekah Isaacs compliments those character moments while also developing the atmosphere in each panel, on the rooftop we see strong gestures of action contrasted with worry and urgency and it’s an enjoyable blend in a season opener. Hopefully the rest of the season carries the momentum and keep feeding new twists along the way.

Release date: Out Now

Story:★★★★½ 
Art:★★★★½ 
Dialog:★★★★½ 
Overall:★★★★½