Review – Hawkeye #2

Writer: Matt Fraction
Artist: David Aja
Colors: Matt Hollingsworth
Letters: Chris Eliopoulos
Cover: David Aja
Published by: Marvel Comics

Hawkeye is back, casual as ever and cool as a cucumber as he brings Kate Bishop into the picture. The young shooting ace for those unaware played a role filling in for Clint over the years. She’s back now but not as some majestic super hero or sidekick but just because she can, it’s a growing trend in this new series and a refreshing one. The thing to remember about this new Hawkeye branch is that it’s a refreshing take on character and storytelling. We’re not always going to be in a life or death situation with the galaxy at stake, when we come into Hawkeye #2 we see that as almost a sitcom introduction as their lives continue on without the reader.

The issue itself gets momentum fast, we learn about things Clint has been up to since we last saw him tackle his own landlord. We also find out why Kate is looming around the apartment reading his paper and drinking his coffee after a dramatic opening panel. The problems never stop in the city and they’re about to explore of them firsthand as an undercover duo tackles a new mystery invading New York. If you enjoyed the easy and direct dialogue of the first Hawkeye, this new one remains just as interesting and even dives into back story around Clint in his youth.

Instead of feeling like a regular action comic I can say Fraction and Aja have created a table piece in my eyes. You read Hawkeye and you don’t just get a quick slap of adventure and a hook for a new issue, instead you get an opening, body and closure to the issue that doesn’t always rely on a hook to keep you going. In theory you could stop reading right now and be perfectly satisfied. That’s how well they’ve handled it and how much of a departure it is from other books running around right now.

Carnivals, criminals, aspiring heroes and a hero all pack themselves into the short amount of pages in Hawkeye #2 and honestly I think fans should really give this series a shot because it doesn’t stop delivering good experiences.

Release Date: September 5, 2012

Story:★★★★★ 
Art:★★★★★ 
Dialog:★★★★½ 
Overall:★★★★½ 

Review – Hawkeye #1 (2012)

Writer: Matt Fraction
Artist: David Aja
Colors: Matt Hollingsworth
Letters: Chris Eliopoulos
Cover: David Aja & Matt Hollingsworth
Variant Covers: Adi Granov, Pasqual Ferry & Matt Hollingsworth
Published by: Marvel Comics

Marvel broke the news on the new Hawkeye release earlier this year, no one really knew how well it would pan out until that first issue hit. Well, issue 1 is here and it’s time to see how this massive grouping of talent works out.

We see Hawkeye outside of his usual element with the Avengers, fighting crime against local crime and dealing with his everyday life outside of saving the world. It’s a unique tale that promises to shed a less glamorous and spectacle filled take on who he is and how his life is outside of those life or death moments, well I shouldn’t say that. Clint Barton manages to get himself into difficult situations no matter where he goes in the world, even in his own neighborhood.

We catch Barton recovering after a mission, his injury putting him on the disabled list for a good period of time until he can catch up and join the Avengers again. In that period though he gets familiar with his old neighborhood and lets off a bit of steam that built up during his hospital time incapacitated. We get to see his home life, what he really wants out of his days and where his sense of justice and fairness really roots itself at. While He’s just a regular guy, he came up through a rougher past and so he’s not the flying stars and stripes representative that we see out of Captain America.

In fact it’s through this book that it becomes clear how Cap and Hawkeye have so many difficulties, easily inspired in battle with him but outside of that he’s very much a man to his own devices and sense of action. Going to far to tell people as Clint, not even Hawkeye, how it’s going to be and making sure to drive that point home using the skills he’s honed to perfection as Hawkeye. There’s humor, tension and a sense of drama and pity for him through the pages, he fights for the underdog and even for dogs and it makes you think of the guy a little different. As a launch issue it takes a calmer tone and works to round out his opening story without feeling rushed and it’s a genuine relief to see given how fast so many other series are moving right now.

Release Date: August 1, 2012

Story:★★★★½ 
Art:★★★★☆ 
Dialog:★★★★½ 
Overall:★★★★½